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7 Smart Questions You Should Ask at the End of Every Job Interview

7 Smart Questions You Should Ask at the End of Every Job Interview

As someone who has interviewed probably thousands of job applicants throughout my career, I’m always surprised by how some candidates handle the part of the interview where it’s their turn to ask questions. 

A strangely large number of people don’t have many questions at all – which is hard to understand when they’re considering spending 40+ hours a week at this job, and when it’ll have an enormous impact on their day-to-day quality of life.

To be fair, a lot of people worry about what questions are okay to ask. They’re concerned about seeming demanding or nitpicky or that their interviewer will draw unflattering conclusions from the questions they ask. It can be hard to elicit the information you really want to learn (like “what are you really like as a manager?” and “am I going to go home crying every day?”) while still being reasonably tactful.And other people are unclear on the purpose of the opportunity to ask questions. 

Rather than using the time to suss out the information they truly want about the job, the manager, and the company, they instead try to use it as a chance to furtherTo be fair, a lot of people worry about what questions are okay to ask. 

They’re concerned about seeming demanding or nitpicky or that their interviewer will draw unflattering conclusions from the questions they ask. It can be hard to elicit the information you really want to learn (like “what are you really like as a manager?” and “am I going to go home crying every day?”) while still being reasonably tactful.

And other people are unclear on the purpose of the opportunity to ask questions. Rather than using the time to suss out the information they truly want about the job, the manager, and the company, they instead try to use it as a chance to further impress their interviewer and pitch themselves for the job. 

That ends up leaving them without the info they need to decide if the job is right for them or not. (It also tends to be pretty transparent, and will annoy interviewers who don’t appreciate having their time wasted that way.) impress their interviewer and pitch themselves for the job. 

That ends up leaving them without the info they need to decide if the job is right for them or not. (It also tends to be pretty transparent, and will annoy interviewers who don’t appreciate having their time wasted that way.)

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Written by Harry Rosen

Harry Rosen is an accomplished explorer, photographer, creative director, speaker, and author.

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